6 October 2010

History revealed

Many of you have never heard of the Wootbird as a species before coming to this blog and most probably believe that this is just a silly creation of mine. Today I will bring to you a short history lesson.

The Wootbird bird species has most likely been around for centuries. The reason it is not officially named as a species is because very few people actually know about it. When only a handful of people know about a creature, it often rapidly becomes a myth very much like dragons and unicorns. Especially when there is no evidence to prove it, it becomes very hard to believe in its existence.

I will take you back to the 16th century today, in which the Italian renaissance painter Titian, also known as Tiziano Vecellio presumably made this remarkable painting called "The Pastoral Concert".


Thanks to recent technological advances in image processing we are now capable of analysing paintings such as these to the utmost precision. Such analytics have revealed an interesting detail in the above painting, proving that at least the idea of the Wootbird goes back as far as the renaissance.

Nothing out of the ordinary can be seen when we zoom in on the tree shown in the background of the painting. But using the advanced methods described above, strange anomalies are revealed.



Looking at the right image above, you will notice the red figures. These are spots marked by the image processor as hidden objects. This is a selection method the analytical software uses to reveal special details, previously unknown to the observer.

Now that the anomalies have been marked, the analytical software continues to enhance the image.


It is fairly clear that the figure or creature shown in the enhanced images above was intended to be a Wootbird. Notice the distinct colour patterns and shape the creature has. This - my dear readers - is undeniable proof of the existence, or at least the idea of the existence of a Wootbird in the days of the renaissance. It is truly a remarkable find. Mythical species researchers will continue analysing art pieces with the help of imaging technicians in the hopes of finding more evidence of the Wootbird.

I will keep you all updated if any more news appears regarding this subject.

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